Analysis of the poem by countee cullen yet do i marvel

In lines of the poem, the speaker alludes to the classical myths of both Tantalus and Sisyphus. He suggests that God might be able to Make plain the reason tortured Tantalus Is baited by the fickle fruit, [and] declare If merely brute caprice dooms Sisyphus To struggle up a never-ending stair. Yet he can in fact reach neither: Sisyphus, in Greek mythology, is punished in the underworld by being forced to roll a huge boulder up a hill.

Analysis of the poem by countee cullen yet do i marvel

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God can never truly be understood by the human mind but there is still a need to marvel at how certain things turn out.

Countee Cullen, born ingraduated from New York University in and had his first book of poems published inColor.

Being black, he soon got to be a part of the Harlem Renaissance. By all accounts he was a talented student and a quick learner and went on to study at Harvard before turning his attention to writing and teaching.

He wrote articles, became an editor and had a novel published inOne Way to Heaven, which had a lukewarm reception in the literary world.

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He became better known for his traditional lyric poetry. I shall not write of Negro subjects for the purpose of propaganda Yet Do I Marvel is written from a first person perspective.

The speaker expresses from the opening line his faith in the goodness of God, and then attempts to put into context just why it is that God's actions are beyond the understanding of mere mortals.

God could explain if he wanted to the challenging life of the blind mole, the reason why our flesh is corruptible, the struggles of mythological characters - life can be hard - but to expect explanation from God is futile. The human brain could not comprehend. For all God's omnipotence, the speaker is still struck by the fact that God made him a poet, and a black one at that.

So in the end, this sonnet is something of a celebration of the possible in life. Yet Do I Marvel I doubt not God is good, well-meaning, kind, And did He stoop to quibble could tell why The little buried mole continues blind, Why flesh that mirrors Him must some day die, Make plain the reason tortured Tantalus Is baited by the fickle fruit, declare If merely brute caprice dooms Sisyphus To struggle up a never-ending stair.

Inscrutable His ways are, and immune To catechism by a mind too strewn With petty cares to slightly understand What awful brain compels His awful hand. Yet do I marvel at this curious thing: To make a poet black, and bid him sing!

Analysis of Yet Do I Marvel Yet Do I Marvel is a sonnet that focuses on the essential paradox of a good God's divinely created life on earth and the puzzling challenges that entails.

It starts with a positive premise, gives examples that might question, and concludes with a little bit of wonder.

Analysis of the poem by countee cullen yet do i marvel

The first line introduces the reader to a speaker who is faithful to his God and does not question his goodness and kindness. Should there be a need for explanation from God concerning the struggles life faces on earth, then this would happen.

And God could tell about the blind mole underground, about why we're made of fallible flesh and bone; he could spell out in simple terms just why we succumb to temptation and endless struggle. The allusions to Greek mythological characters - Tantalus and Sisyphus - bring a historical context to the challenges we face that are sometimes hard to bear, seemingly set in motion by a God that must surely be cruel and heartless.

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But the actions of God can never be truly understood, there is no way of explaining them or writing them down as questions and answers in doctrinal form catechism. The human mind can only understand so much, it is incapable of grasping what lies within the mind of God, awesome thing that he is.

So, the first twelve lines of the sonnet are essentially saying that, from the standpoint of the speaker, God is moral, despite the awful things that happen on earth; he doesn't need to explain away his actions because we couldn't comprehend him anyway.

In the end, all there is is wonder.

Analysis of the poem by countee cullen yet do i marvel

The speaker marvels at the fact that God has granted him, a black man, the gift of poetry has bid him sing!In Countee Cullen's poem "Yet Do I Marvel," does the speaker's attitude towards God change or do Countee Cullen published his wonderful little sonnet "Yet Do I Marvel" in Free rhyme papers, essays, and research papers.

"Grenadier" Meter and Rhyme Scheme Analysis - Authors and poets primarily use literary devices to provide a greater understanding for their own work, yet some writers use them effectively while others fail in doing so.

The classical allusions in Countee Cullen’s poem “Yet Do I Marvel” contribute effectively to the poem in a number of ways. In lines of the poem, the speaker alludes to the classical.

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Feb 23,  · In the last two lines of the poem the speaker states "Yet I marvel at this curious thing:/ To make a poet black and bid him sing." In saying this the speaker "marvels" at the fact that God would be so cruel as to make him black and a poet in the 's when racism was so prominent.

Feb 23,  · In this poem Countee Cullen uses allusions* and enjambment** to explore the idea of God's incomprehensible nature and illustrate the poet's confusion at why he was made a poet in a time period that didn't accept him.

Revisiting the Harlem Renaissance: "Yet Do I Marvel" A Poetry Analysis Of Countee Cullen