Salic law

See Article History Salic Law of Succession, the rule by which, in certain sovereign dynastiespersons descended from a previous sovereign only through a woman were excluded from succession to the throne. Because each French king from the late 10th century to the early 14th century had a son who could succeed him, the Capetian dynasty was not faced with any controversy over succession to the throne.

Salic law

In contrast, a slave was fully owned by the lord. Some tenets of the law[ edit ] These laws and their interpretations give an insight into Frankish society. The criminal laws established damages to be paid and fines levied in recompense for injuries to persons and damage to goods e.

One-third of the fine paid court costs. Judicial interpretation was by a jury of peers. The civil law establishes that an individual person is legally unprotected if he or she does not belong to a family. The rights of family members were defined: Agnatic succession[ edit ] One tenet of the civil law is agnatic successionexplicitly excluding females from the inheritance of a throne or fief.

Indeed, "Salic law" has often been used simply as a synonym for agnatic succession. But the importance of Salic law extends beyond the rules of inheritance, as it is a direct ancestor of the systems of law in use in many parts of continental Europe today.

Salic law regulates succession according to sex. Agnatic succession means succession to the throne or fief going to an agnate of the predecessor: Chief forms are agnatic seniority and agnatic primogeniture.

The latter, which has been the most usual, means succession going to the eldest son of the monarch; if the monarch had no sons, the throne would pass to the nearest male relative in the male line.

Female inheritance[ edit ] This article needs attention from an expert on the subject. Please add a reason or a talk parameter to this template to explain the issue with the article.

When placing this tag, consider associating this request with a WikiProject. May See also: Terra salica Concerning the inheritance of land, Salic Law said: But of Salic land no portion of the inheritance shall come to a woman: As interpreted by the Salian Franks, the law merely prohibited women from inheriting ancestral "Salic land"; this prohibition did not apply to other property such as personal property ; and under Chilperic I sometime around the yearthe law was actually amended to permit inheritance of land by a daughter if a man had no surviving sons.

This amendment, depending on how it is applied and interpreted, offers the basis for either Semi-Salic succession or male-preferred primogenitureor both.

The wording of the law, as well as common usage in those days and centuries afterwards, seems to support an interpretation that inheritance is divided between brothers.

And, if it is intended to govern succession, it can be interpreted to mandate agnatic senioritynot direct primogeniture.Salic Law of Succession: Salic Law of Succession, the rule by which, in certain sovereign dynasties, persons descended from a previous sovereign only through a woman were excluded from succession to the throne.

Gradually formulated in France, the rule takes its name from the code of the Salian Franks, the Lex Salica (Salic.

The Salic Law was the early Germanic law code of the Salian Franks.

Salic law

Originally dealing primarily with criminal penalties and procedures, with some civil law included, the Salic Law evolved over the centuries, and it would later play an important role in the rules governing royal succession.

Salic Law: Salic Law,, the code of the Salian Franks who conquered Gaul in the 5th century and the most important, although not the oldest, of all Teutonic laws (leges barbarorum).

Salic law

The code was issued late (c. –) in the reign of Clovis, the founder of Merovingian power in western Europe. It was twice. The Salic law in this respect was important in French history. It first was used in France early in the 14th century by King Philip V.

The law later formed the legal basis for the denial of the French crown to Edward III, king of England, whose mother was a daughter of the French king Philip IV; this dispute was the basis of the Hundred Years.

Salic law (sā`lĭk), rule of succession in certain royal and noble families of Europe, forbidding females and those descended in the female line to succeed to the titles or offices in the regardbouddhiste.com is called the Salic law on the mistaken supposition that it was part of the Lex Salica (see Germanic laws Germanic laws, customary law codes of the Germans before their contact with the Romans. Semi-Salic law For a clearer explanation of the differences between Salic, Semi-Salic laws and male-preference primogeniture, see Salic law. Another variation on agnatic primogeniture is the so-called semi-Salic law, or "agnatic-cognatic primogeniture", which allows women to succeed only at the extinction of all the male descendants in the. The Salic Law was the early Germanic law code of the Salian Franks. Originally dealing primarily with criminal penalties and procedures, with some civil law included, the Salic Law evolved over the centuries, and it would later play an important role in the rules governing royal succession.

Salic law did not apply to some areas of France, including Brittany and Navarre. Anne of Brittany ( - ) inherited the duchy when her father left no sons. (She was the Queen of France through two marriages, including her second to Louis XII; she was the mother of Louis' daughter Claude, who, unlike her mother, could not inherit her.

Jan 13,  · The Salic Law (Lex Salica) is a code of law written around the time of Clovis () for the Salian Franks, in Latin mixed with Germanic words.

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